Eminent scientist's 160-year-old theories aid light wave discovery

Eminent scientist’s 160-year-old theories aid light wave discovery

Science/Environment

A formerly unknown light wave is now found by scientists, based on the work of an eminent 19th century scientist from Scotland.

The researchers were able to determine how crystals could be manipulated in order to create a distinct light wave using the equations formed by the veteran physicist as well as mathematician James Clerk Maxwell.

The phenomena was recently given the name Dyakonov-Voight waves. It could have an array of major technological applications like enhancing biosensors utilized to screen the blood samples.

The discovery was made by engineers and scientists from the Pennsylvania State University and Edinburgh University by examining how the light interacts along with certain complex man-made or naturally occurring crystals.

The result showed that Dyakonov-Voight waves were produced at a particular region called interface where crystals met another material like water or oil. Only a few kinds of crystals, having optical properties based upon the direction of light, are able to produce such waves, said the researchers.

The team of researchers identified the unique properties of the waves by using mathematical models incorporating equations developed by Maxwell. As per Tim Mackay, lead author of the study, Dyakonov-Voight waves help to better understand how light interacts along with materials and provides opportunities for a lot of useful advancements.

Nicole Hansen

Nicole is a science graduate and professional with a strong experience in content management of Science and Environment related articles. Her strength includes the sound knowledge of science, astronomy and environment.

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